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USS Yantic - History

USS Yantic - History


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Yantic

(ScGbt: dp. 836; Ibp. 179'0"; b. 30'; dr. 13'9" (max.); s. 9.5 k., cpl. 154; a. 1 100-pdr. P.r., 1 30-par. P.r.'2 9" D.sb., 2 24-pdr. how., 2 12-pdrs.; cl. Nipsie)

Yantic—a wooden-hulled screw gunboat built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard—was launched on 19 March 1864 and commissioned on 12 August 1864, Lt. Comdr. Thomas C. Harris in command.

The next day, Yantic—in company with the tugs Aster and Moccasin sailed in pursuit of the Confederate "pirate" CSS Tallahassee. The gunboat went to the northward and eastward of Nantucket during her cruise but, as her commanding officer reported, "obtained no information to justify a longer search for the piratical vessel." Consequently, after a week at sea, Yantic returned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard and commenced her post-trial repairs.

Meanwhile, CSS Tallahassee had left Halifax, Nova Scotia, at 1300 on 20 August, before any Federal warships could arrive, setting in motion a search. Agitation in Washington over Tallahassee resulted in Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles' sending identical telegrams to the commandants of the navy yards at New York and Philadelphia on the 20th, each asking what vessels were ready for sea.

Yantic subsequently received orders directing her to proceed to Wood's Hole, Mass., where she was to await further orders. She arrived there at 1000 on 13 September. Yantic later operated off the eastern seaboard between Hampton Roads and New York and, on 1 November, visited Halifax—a port swarming with "secessionists and other sympathizers"—to obtain information on the activities of CSS Olustee (as the Confederates had renamed Tallahassee).

After the Confederate ship had managed to elude her pursuers, Yantic joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron off Wilmington, N.C. During the Union's first attempt to take Fort Fisher, N.C., on Christmas Eve 1864, the screw gunboat suffered her first casualties. At 1500 that afternoon, during the bombardment phase of the action, the ship's 100pounder rifled gun burst, mortally wounding the division officer, the gun captain, and four men. On his own initiative, Comdr. Harris—thinking his ship "badly shattered" and not knowing the extent of the damage —ordered his ship hauled out of line. After obtaining medical assistance from the steamer Fort Jackson and reporting the assessed damage to the flagship Malvern, Harris took Yantic back into action, opening fire with his remaining effective guns, the 30-pounder rifle and a 9-inch Dahigren.

On Christmas Day 1864, Yantic assisted in the debarking of the troops of General Benjamin Butler and covered the landing operations. At 1400, on the 25th, as Lt. Harris later reported, the troops landed"amidst deafening and encouraging cheers from the men-of-war and from the troops still abroad the transports, cheers which were echoed by the fleet by a fire that elicited but a feeble response from the fort." General Butler, however, "to the surprise and mortification of all" (as Harris later recounted), recalled the troops; and the landing operation ceased.

The first Union attempt to reduce and take Fort Fisher thus proved to be a dismal failure; but, before another attempt was made, General Butler was replaced by a more dynamic and aggressive man, Major General Alfred H. Terry. Yantic provided a landing party and gunfire support for the second amphibious attack that commenced on 13 January 1865. In the action—a bloody one in which the sailors and marines of the naval landing force charged on the run into withering Confederate gunfire and suffered accordingly grievous casualties in the frontal assault—Fort Fisher was finally taken on 16 January. During the battle, Yantic lost three men—two on 15 January and one, who had been wounded mortally on the 15th, who died on the 20th.

The next month, Yantic participated in the capture of Fort Anderson, N.C., between 17 and 19 February in her second major landing operation in a little over a month. For the remainder of the Civil War, Yantic served on blockade duties, as part of the successful Union interdiction operation, preventing trade by sea with the Confederacy.

For a little over three more decades, Yantic "showed the flag" of the United States in the West Indies, in South American waters, and in the Far East—as well as along the eastern seaboard of the United States. After operating fairly close to home from 1865 to 1872, she then cruised to the Asiatic Station, where she operated for the next four years, 1873 to 1877.

During that particular tour of duty, Yantic stood ready to provide assistance for Americans and protection for their property. While operating with the Asiatic Squadron—precursor of the Asiatic Fleet and the 7th Fleet—the gunboat put ashore her landing force at Shanghai, China, on 3 May 1874, in company with the landing party from the sidewheeler Ashuelot to aid in quelling a riot by the local natives.

At other times during that Asiatic Squadron deployment, Yantic conducted a regular routine of cruises to ports ranging from Canton, Borneo, the Philippine Islands, and Hong Kong. In late 1874, when the Pacific Mail Steamer Japan foundered, Yantic searched for her. In the spring of 1875, the gunboat later protected the salvagers of Japan's cargo from pirates.

Subsequently, Yantic's crew took part in celebrations attending the unveiling of the statue of Admiral David G. Farragut in Washington, D.C., on 25 April 1881, before sailing later that spring to Mexican waters. In June, at Progreso, Yucatan, she investigated the detention of the American bark Acacia before returning northward to familiar waters off the eastern seaboard of the United States. In October 1881, Yantic also took part in observances commemorating the centennial of the Battle of Groton Heights and in festivities celebrating the centennial of the American victory at Yorktown, VA.

In June of 1883, Yantic headed for the coasts of Greenland, Comdr. Frank Wildes in command, as tender for the steamer Proteus the latter carrying the men of the second relief party sent out to search for the exploration party led by Lt. A. W. Greely, USA. After touching at Disco, Upernavik, and Littleton Island, Yantic returned to New York on 29 September 1883. She carried back with her the men of the relief party, led by Lt. Garlington, and also the officers and men of Proteus, which had been crushed in heavy ice on 23 July 1883. Unfortunately, neither ship found any trace of the ill fated Greely expedition.

Yantic "showed the flag" along the eastern seaboard and into the waters of South America and the West Indies from 1884 to 1897. In 1898, she was then loaned to the naval militia of the state of Michigan and served as training ship on the Great Lakes until 1917.

With America's entry into World War I, the Navy expanded. Accordingly, the Civil War gunboat was recommissioned in 1917 and assigned as a training ship at the Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill. After the armistice, she was struck from the Navy list on 24 July 1919 and ordered sold. However, the venerable Yantic was withdrawn from the sale list on 31 December of the same year and again assigned duty as a training ship this time with the Naval Reserve Forces of the 9th, 10th, and 11th Naval Districts. Commissioned on 16 May 1921, Yantic—designated IX-32—operated out of Cleveland, Ohio, until 30 June 1926, when she was decommissioned and again loaned to the state of Michigan.

Yantic suddenly sank along side the dock at the foot of Townsend Ave., Detroit, Mich., on 22 October 1929. Subsequent investigation revealed that the sinking had been caused by structural weakening, owing to "natural deterioration." She was struck from the Navy list on 9 May 1930.


USS Yantic

Yantic - a wooden-hulled screw gunboat built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard - was launched on 19 March 1864 and commissioned on 12 August 1864, Lt. Comdr. Thomas C. Harris in command.

The next day, Yantic - in company with the tugs Aster and Moccasin - sailed in pursuit of the Confederate "pirate" CSS Tallahassee. The gunboat went to the northward and eastward of Nantucket during her cruise but, as her commanding officer reported, "obtained no information to justify a longer search for the piratical vessel." Consequently, after a week at sea, Yantic returned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard and commenced her post-trial repairs.

Meanwhile, CSS Tallahassee had left Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 20 August, before any Federal warships could arrive, setting in motion a search. Agitation in Washington over Tallahassee resulted in Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles' sending identical telegrams to the commandants of the navy yards at New York and Philadelphia on the 20th, each asking what vessels were ready for sea.

Yantic subsequently received orders directing her to proceed to Wood's Hole, Mass., where she was to await further orders. She arrived there on 13 September. Yantic later operated off the eastern seaboard between Hampton Roads and New York and, on 1 November, visited Halifax - a port swarming with "secessionists and other sympathizers" - to obtain information on the activities of CSS Olustee (as the Confederates had renamed Tallahassee).

After the Confederate ship had managed to elude her pursuers, Yantic joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron off Wilmington, N.C. During the Union's first attempt to take Fort Fisher, N.C., on Christmas Eve 1864, the screw gunboat suffered her first casualties. At 1500 that afternoon, during the bombardment phase of the action, the ship's 100-pounder rifled gun burst, mortally wounding the division officer, the gun captain, and four men. On his own initiative, Comdr. Harris - thinking his ship "badly shattered" and not knowing the extent of the damage - ordered his ship hauled out of line. After obtaining medical assistance from the steamer Fort Jackson and reporting the assessed damage to the flagship Malvern, Harris took Yantic back into action, opening fire with his remaining effective guns, the 30-pounder rifle and a 9-inch Dahlgren.

On Christmas Day 1864, Yantic assisted in the debarking of the troops of General Benjamin Butler and covered the landing operations. At 1400, on the 25th, as Lt. Comdr. Harris later reported, the troops landed "amidst deafening and encouraging cheers from the men-of-war and from the troops still aborad the transports, cheers which were echoed by the fleet by a fire that elicited but a feeble response from the fort." General Butler, however, "to the surprise and mortification of all" (as Harris later recounted), recalled the troops and the landing operation ceased.

The first Union attempt to reduce and take Fort Fisher thus proved to be a dismal failure but, before another attempt was made, General Butler was replaced by a more dynamic and aggressive man, Major General Alfred H. Terry. Yantic provided a landing party and gunfire support for the second amphibious attack that commenced on 13 January 1865. In the action - a bloody one in which the sailors and marines of the naval landing force charged on the run into withering Confederate gunfire and suffered accordingly grievous casualties in the frontal assault - Fort Fisher was finally taken on 15 January. During the battle, Yantic lost three men - two on 15 January and one, who had been wounded mortally on the 15th, who died on the 20th.

The next month, Yantic participated in the capture of Fort Anderson, N.C., between 17 and 19 February, in her second major landing operation in a little over a month. For the remainder of the Civil War, Yantic served on blockade duties, as part of the successful Union interdiction operation, preventing trade by sea with the Confederacy.

For a little over three more decades, Yantic "showed the flag" of the United States in the West Indies, in South American waters, and in the Far East - as well as along the eastern seaboard of the United States. After operating fairly close to home from 1865 to 1872, she then cruised to the Asiatic Station, where she operated for the next four years, 1873 to 1877.

In June of 1883, Yantic headed for the coasts of Greenland, Comdr. Frank Wildes in command, as tender for the steamer Proteus, the latter carrying the men of the second relief party sent out to search for the exploration party led by Lt. A. W. Greely, USA. After touching at Disco, Upernavik, and Littleton Island, Yantic returned to New York on 29 September 1883. She carried back with her the men of the relief party, led by Lt. Garlington, and also the officers and men of Proteus, which had been crushed in heavy ice on 23 July 1883. Unfortunately, neither ship found any trace of the ill-fated Greely expedition.

Yantic "showed the flag" along the eastern seaboard and into the waters of South America and the West Indies from 1884 to 1897. In 1898, she was then loaned to the naval militia of the state of Michigan and served as training ship on the Great Lakes until 1917.

With America's entry into World War I, the Navy expanded. Accordingly, the Civil-War gunboat was recommissioned in 1917 and assigned as a training ship at the Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, 111. After the armistice, she was struck from the Navy list on 24 July 1919 and ordered sold. However, the venerable Yantic was withdrawn from the sale list on 31 December of the same year and again assigned duty as a training ship - this time with the Naval Reserve Forces of the 9th, 10th, and 11th Naval Districts. Commissioned on 15 May 1921, Yantic - designated IX-32 - operated out of Cleveland, Ohio, until 30 June 1926, when she was decommissioned and again loaned to the state of Michigan.

Yantic suddenly sank alongside the dock at the foot of Townsend Ave., Detroit, Mich., on 22 October 1929. Subsequent investigation revealed that the sinking had been caused by structural weakening, owing to "natural deterioration." She was struck from the Navy list on 9 May 1930.


Frank Baldwin, U.S. Army

Frank Baldwin , a career U.S. Army officer, was recommended for the Medal of Honor three times while fighting two different adversaries and practically didn’t have an off-day from soldiering for 35 years across the American West! He served under George Armstrong Custer and alongside the legendary lawman “Bat” Masterson . They were living legends in a time when turmoil between the nation and American Indian tribes could make or break the direction of our country’s future. The 1864 Battle of Peachtree saw the captain leading “his company in a countercharge, under a galling fire ahead of his own men, and singly entered the enemy’s line, capturing and bringing back two commissioned officers, fully armed, besides a guidon of a Georgia regiment.”

Harper’s Weekly sat down with Masterson and discussed their heroic campaign during the winter of 1868 to 1869. He spoke of then-Lieutenant Baldwin serving alongside him and how he was responsible for leading a company of Custer’s scouts in 7 degrees below zero weather and two feet of snow into Indian Territory on Thanksgiving Day. Baldwin also served under notorious Indian fighter Nelson A. Miles in 1874 and was responsible for rooting the violence from the Cheyenne, Kiowa, Arapahoe, and Comanche tribes. When his unit received word that two women were captured by a superior force of Indians, Baldwin led a two-company-strong rescue to save them. For these actions, he was awarded his second Medal of Honor.

Baldwin retired after 40 years of service and was later recalled to the National Guard to help mentor soldiers entering World War I. He spent his final days in Colorado with his wife and daughter.


USS Yantic - History

Marcus W. Robbins , Historian & Archivist
Copyright. All rights reserved.

New York Times - Norfolk, Va. September 19, 1889:

NORFOLK'S BIG DRY DOCK

IT COST THE GOVERNMENT A HALF A MILLION

OVER ALL THE DOCK IS 530 FEET AND WILL HOLD 8,000,000 GALLONS OF WATER

THE FORMAL OPENING


I'll circle back and share a few specific details from this newspaper story in a moment but first some background is in order.

Dry Dock #2 at the Norfolk Navy Yard was at one time a wooden dock. Yes, I said wood. It was also first referred to as the Simpson Dock named for the company that constructed it and several other like it around the country.

As a structure it is begun in November of 1887 and was declared completed on September 19, 1889, with the docking of the USS Yantic. This new dock along with so many other Norfolk Navy Yard facilities upgraded in the later part of the 19th century firmly established Norfolk to be able to provide complex repairs and services upon the largest vessels in Uncle Sam's growing fleet.

I have made this statement before but it bears repeating again. "Any place can have a river berth or a pier to safely tie a vessel up to, but what sets apart a true shipyard is its ability to perform dry docking. This location, being the Norfolk Navy Yard along the Elizabeth River has the ability to take any vessel of Uncle Sam’s Navy out of its natural element (water) and allow it to become docked (dry) so craftsmen may perform repairs to the underwater hull sections and components."

This new dock was established just to the south of the original Gosport Stone Dock and in time causes that structure's operational name to become known as Dry Dock #1. The new Simpson Dock will over time become known as today's Dry Dock #2.


Photo #1

Location of New Dry Dock #2
(Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum (PNSM) Collection, Station Map of June 30, 1889)

Today we are all about staying loyal to our current modern day motto of "Service To The Fleet", so what about the USS Yantic? Well, Yantic was a wooden-hulled vessel that served the Navy from 1864 until 1930 in various roles from Civil War service to use as a training ship. In the year of 1889 there must have been a need to look below the waterline and perform maintenance and repairs, thus a docking.


Photo #2

IX-32, (ex-USS) Yantic
(Navy History and Heritage Command Collection, #69215 taken circa 1921)

Frank Leslie's Weekly Newspaper - November 2, 1889:

NORFOLK'S NEW DRY-DOCK

The formal opening of the new Simpson Dry-dock at Norfolk (Va.) Navy Yard, which occurred a few weeks since, attracted a large crowd of visitors, including a number of prominent officials from Washington and elsewhere. The first vessel to steam into the dock after it was flooded, was the steamer Yantic, handsomely dressed with bunting in honor of the occasion. The dock is of large dimensions, and its construction adds materially to the facilities and advantages of the Norfolk Navy Yard. Its cost to the Government was $495,737.

So circling back to that New York Times story we find these fascinating details about our new wooden dock. It took precisely one hour to fill the dock to a depth of 23 feet 9 inches of water. It took another hour to lighten the ballast of water within the caisson gate and swing it out of the way. After this the Yantic entered the dock with the Navy Yard band playing upon her deck both popular and patriotic strains. At 12:04 she settled down and the caisson gate was swung to behind her.

As the story details the great number of private and naval dignitaries that spoke at the ceremony, what always fascinates me are construction details. The dock was able to be emptied of water in the short time of 1 hour and 5 minutes (8 million gallons of water). The foundation of the dock is piling, over which to the depth of three feet is a solid bed of concrete. Above the concrete floor, the dock is of wood and almost a million feet of Georgia heart pine and almost as much other lumber was used in its construction. The dock was completed in just twenty months from the time of the signing of the contracts.


Photo #3

Dry Dock #2 Looking West
(Historic Norfolk Navy Yard Photo Collection, circa early 1930's)

Over the many decades of service our Dry Dock #2 was rebuilt of total concrete beginning in 1933, and again received major work to both deepen and widen the dock between the years of 1964 to 1966 to support submarine service work. This is basically the configuration you see today, yet plans are being made for yet even more upgrades and improvements to take us into the 22nd century and beyond.

The site of Dry Dock #2 is now well into its second century of continuous service for the United States Navy here at "America’s Shipyard" because –"history matters".

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Norfolk Navy Yard Table of Contents


USS Yantic - History

CASUALTIES of the UNITED STATES NAVY and COAST GUARD

by Date and Ship/Base - December 1917

US Submarine F-1, lost with all hands December 17, 1917 (US Naval Historical Center, click to enlarge)

1. Information is in order - Date of death, Ship, Base or Location, Incident, Name, Rank, Service other than USN, Cause of death. (For Next of kin and Appointment/Enlistment information, see lists by Name)
2. Main abbreviations: A - Aviation, DOI - died of injuries, DOW - died of wounds, F - Female, G - General, JG - junior grade, NNV - National Naval Volunteers, R - Radio, USNRF - US Naval Reserve Force, USNRC - United States Naval Reserve Corps
3. Ranks of US Navy Commissioned Officers and Enlisted Men
4. See also Casualties by Name, starting at Abbate and ending at Zwieseland

DECEMBER

December 2, 1917

USS America, ex-German liner Amerika, troop transport (ID-3006)

BURDET, FRANCIS, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease (right - thanks to Eric Nash)

December 3, 1917

Naval Hospital, New York, N Y

BOWSER, JAMES MONROE, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

ALTMAN, IRBY ANDERSON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

STARK, HARRY EARL, Fireman, 3rd class, illness /disease

WILLINGHAM, WILLIE MORGAN, Fireman, 2nd class, illness/disease

Norfolk, Va

WILLIAMS, RICHARD BLAND, Surgeon (Medical Corps), wounded, but not in action

USS George Washington, ex-German liner, troop transport (ID-3018)

STOREY, DANIEL DEWEY, Seaman, 2nd class, injured

December 4, 1917

Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa

DUNCAN, JAMES BRADY, Blacksmith, respiratory disease

Naval Training Station, Cedar Falls, Iowa

MINKLE, HAROLD WATSON, Seaman, 2nd class, killed by train

Quincy, Mass

WELLS, JOHN C, Chief Machinist's Mate, USNRF, accident, died

December 5, 1917

Aviation Naval Headquarters, Paris, France, airplane accident (location probably outside Paris)

BAKER, CLAUDE ALBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, drowned

St Marys Hospital, Hoboken N J

ABEL, LUTHER VELVIN, Seaman, 2nd class, injured

USS Yantic, old wooden-hulled gunboat, training ship, Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

OAK, HARRY ARTHUR, Chief Boatswain's Mate, USNRF, illness/disease

December 6, 1917

Naval Hospital, Annapolis, Md

IRWIN, GLENDON WARD, Ensign, died

Naval Hospital, Maiden, Mass

BOYLE, JOHN JOSEPH, Chief Water Tender, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

RICE, EARL ALBERT, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

HALL, JOHN MARSHALL, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Jacob Jones (above also image of the torpedo exploding, taken by Seaman William G Ellis. No enlargement), destroyer (No.61), sailing Brest, France for Queenstown, Ireland, torpedoed and sunk by U.53

ANDERSEN, HENRY P, Gunner's Mate, 2nd class

BIELATOWICZ, JOHN WILLIAM, Seaman, 2nd class

BRAMMALL, JOHN THOMAS, Jr, Chief Water Tender

BRANNIGAN, JAMES, Fireman, 2nd class

BRYAN, GEORGE FREDERICK, Seaman, 2nd class

BUTLER, JOHN EDWARD, Fireman, 2nd class

CHAPPIE, FRANK WILLIAM, Seaman, 2nd class

COONEY, JOHN JOSEPH, Chief Water Tender

COSTIGAN, MAURICE JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class

CROSS, JAMES FRANK MORISON, Gunner's Mate, 1st class

CUMMINGS, JAMES, Seaman, 2nd class

DISMUKE, EDWARD TOM, Gunner's Mate, 2nd class

DONOVAN, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Boiler maker

EBISCH, CABL G, Quartermaster, 3rd class

FAVREAU, HENRY PHILIPPE, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

FISHER, REGINALD JOHN, Seaman, 2nd class

FITZGERALD, JAMES STEPHEN, Gunner's Mate, 2nd class

FLAHERTY, JOHN JAMES, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

FLANAGHAN, THOMAS HENRY, Seaman, 2nd class

FRANCIS, JAMES ALVA, Electrician, 3rd class

FRENCH, CHARLES, Fireman, 1st class, Fleet Reserve

GIFFORD, WILLIAM THOMAS, Fireman, 2nd class

GREGORY, SCHUYLER, Coppersmith

GRINNELL, CLIFTON STEPHENS, Seaman, 2nd class

HIGHET, LELAND McKEAND, Seaman, 2nd class

HILL, LUTHER, Fireman, 1st class

HOOD, HARRY R, Gunner

JASKOLSKI, FRANCIS JOHN, Fireman, 2nd class

JOHNSON, DOCK, Cabin Cook

KALK, STANTON F, Lieutenant (JG), exposure

KEARNEY, WILLIAM HIRST, Oiler

LA COMBE, HENRY JOSEPH, Fireman, 2nd class

LASKON, WILLIAM FRANK, Fireman, 1st class

LEEDY, ARCHIE, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

LENTZ, HERBERT PAUL, Fireman, 2nd class

MAGENUEIMER, FREDERICK, Fireman, 1st class

McGINTY, JOHN WILLIAM, Water Tender

McKEOWN, BERNARD JOSEPH, Fireman, 1st class

MENDES, JOSE ANTHONY, Fireman, 1st class

MERKEL, GEORGE CHRISTIAN, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

MICHALEO, JOHN, Seaman, 2nd class

MONTIEL, ALFONSO, Mess Attendant, 2nd class

MORGAN, EUGENE JOHN, Yeoman, 2nd class

MORRISSETTE, WALTER, Ship's Cook, 1st class, injured

MURPHY, JOSEPH PATRICK, Fireman, 3rd class, injured

MURPHY, SIMON THOMAS, Fireman, 3rd class

NEE, MARTIN JOSEPH, Chief Machinist's Mate

PETERSON, ARTHUR JOSEPH, Quartermaster, 1st class

PHILLIPS, ADOLPH, Water Tender

PLANT, HOWARD WILLIAM, Electrician, 3rd class (R)

POTE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Oiler

ROGERS, COIT SEYMOUR, Storekeeper, 3rd class

ROGERS, GEORGE FRANCIS, Fireman, 3rd class

SANFORD, CHARLIE HEIDEL, Ship’s Cook, 3rd class

SIMMONS, CHARLES ROBERT, Machinist's Mate, 1st class (BN - killed in accident)

SIMPSON, WALLACE, Cabin Steward

SOHN, WILLIAM HENRY, Chief Machinist's Mate

STARK, RICHARD JOSEPH, Quartermaster, 1st class

STEINER, SIMON, Chief Quartermaster

SWEENEY, JAMES TEREANCE, Oiler

TUFTS, JOHN THOMAS, Blacksmith

WETZEL, LEON JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class

WILLIAMS, RALPH BURGEE, Seaman


(Note: the above list totals 63 men lost. Variations include Naval History and Heritage Center - 64 lost, and Wikipedia - 66, 2 officers and 64 men. The differences need reconciliation)


December 7, 1917

Naval Air Station, Hampton Roads, Va

RICHTER, GEORGE, Quartermaster, 1st class, USNRF, injured (not known if flying-related)

Naval Hospital, Canacao, P I

SCHAEFER, JOSEPH, Chief Electrician (G), died of burns

Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

HUTCHESON, ROY ALVIN, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Huntington, ex-West Virginia, armored cruiser (No.5, later CA-5)

SPANGLER, GEORGE ANDREW, Seaman, 2nd class, drowned

USS Montana, armored cruiser (No.13, later CA-13)

WILLIAMS, BRUCE BRECHEEN, Yeoman, 3rd class, drowned

USS Solace, hospital ship (later AH-2)

FORE, ELLIE ELBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

December 8, 1917

USS Jacob Jones, destroyer (No.61), sailing Brest, France for Queenstown, Ireland, torpedoed and sunk by U.53 (on 6th)

DOLEZAL, GEORGE, Water Tender, presumably DOI

Willard Parker Hospital, New York, N Y

LYONS, RAYMOND THOMAS, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

December 9, 1917

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

GOUGH, EARNEST MARVIN, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Submarine Base, San Pedro, Calif

McCRARY, HARRY LEE, Electrician, 1st class, injured

USS Georgia, battleship (later BB-15)

GROZIER, EDGAR SNOW, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class, respiratory disease

December 10, 1917

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass

SHINN, EDWARD COFFIN, Chief Water Tender, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

SPROUSE, EMMET, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

USS Antigone, ex-German Neckar, troop transport (ID-3007)

WHITE, ALBERT E, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, drowned

USS Solace, hospital ship (later AH-2)

DILLON, FRANCIS XAVIER, Electrician, 2nd class, NNV, respiratory disease

December 11, 1917

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

RAMSEY, WILLIAM HENRY, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

USS Baltimore, ex-protected cruiser (No.3), minelayer (later CM-1)

PINKE, JOHN HOWARD, Cabin Steward, illness/disease

USS Cuyama, oil tanker (No.3, later AO-3)

GLEICH, RICHARD NORMAN, Seaman, 2nd class, fell from foremast

USS Frederick, ex-Maryland, armored cruiser (No.8, later CA-8)

WARREN, CHARLES, Fireman, 1st class, injured

December 12, 1917

Naval Hospital, Mare Island, Calif

CARNALL, MILTON PAGE, Oiler, NNV, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

EVANS, GEORGE STOKER, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

STEPHENSON, JOHN R, Seaman, NNV, illness/disease

Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

PRICE, LAWRENCE HANNON, Fireman, 3rd class, United States Naval Force, died

Philadelphia, Pa

BURTON, RICHARD, Jr, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, trolley car accident

Receiving Ship, Washington, D C

MULCAHY, JOHN MICHAEL, Fireman, 1st class, illness/disease

USS Chemung, ex-USS Pocohontas, fleet tug (No.18), fire room blaze

HAMPTON, LOYD JOHN, Water Tender

ROSS, BRUCE W, Machinist, burns, died at Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va (BN - duplicated entry, also ROSS, BRUCE WALLACE, Chief Machinist's Mate NHC - Machinist trainee)

USS Elizabeth (above), ex-chandler's workboat, patrol boat (SP-972), Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, Va, sunk in collision with SS Northland (British-owned) in Norfolk Harbor (later salvaged)

ROSE, THOMAS JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, drowned

TOERPE, ARTHUR BEN, Ordnance Gunner (R), injured, died at Naval Hospital, Norfolk

December 13, 1917

Naval Hospital, Newport R I

SADDLER, EDWARD, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

BIGGER, DAVID WATSON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Mare Island, Calif

PICHETT, ZIP EDWARD, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

New York, N Y

DUNN, HENRY ALBERT, Medical Inspector, illness/disease

St Luke's Hospital, New York, N Y

THOMPSON, ANDREW, Boatswain's Mate, 1st class, USNRF, illness/disease

USS Chemung, ex-USS Pocohontas, fleet tug (No.18 ) ) , fire room blaze on 12th

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM, Chief Water Tender, died of burns at Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

USS Shada, ex-motor boat, patrol craft (SP-580), coast from Boston to Maine

BROKAW SHERMAN SEAL, Seaman, USNRF, lost overboard

December 14, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

FOORD, J S, Apprentice Seaman USNRF, frostbite

LANCASTER, AUBREY, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

BUTLER, MONETTE FORD, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

KEMP, ARON WILSON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

RATHBONE, PETER WILLIAM, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

SATURDAY, MAJOR McKINLEY, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

USS Hull, destroyer (later DD-7)

MATTESON, WILLIAM FRANCIS, Seaman, 2nd class, lost overboard

USS Shada, ex-motor boat, patrol craft (SP-580), coast from Boston to Maine

BOLGER, JAMES, Seaman, USNRF, drowned

USS Sonoma, fleet tug (later AT-12), Atlantic Fleet tender

WEIR, JOHN JOSEPH, Carpenter's Mate, 3rd class, lost overboard

December 15, 1917

Lincoln Hospital, New York, N Y

HAMMER, JAS MARTIN, Seaman, poisoned by illuminating gas

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

DUFFY, LEO JOHN, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

FRAZIER, HUGH ARTHUR, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

McSWEEN, BONNIE, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, San Pedro, Calif

HILL, MARTIN JEREMIAH, Chief Machinist's Mate, illness/disease

Royal Italian Naval Hospital, Naples

HESLEP, WALTER JAMES, Oiler, injured

St Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, D C

MEALLEY, THADDEUS, Chief Yeoman, illness/disease

USS Amphitrite, ex-monitor (BM 2), guardship, New York harbor

RETTIGER, GEORGE H, Seaman, NNV, illness/disease

USS Pittsburgh, ex-Pennsylvania, armored cruiser (No.4, later CA-4), most of war in South American waters

STEWART, OSCAR WILL, Fireman, 3rd class, injured

December 17, 1917

Naval Hospital, Newport, R I

WEED, DAVID JONATHAN, Apprentice Seaman, illness /disease

Naval Hospital, Newport, R I

ELLIOTT AMASA, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

DUNYHUE, WILLIAM ANDIE, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

WALLER, LAURAMA MALONE, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Aviation, possibly based at Royal Naval Air Station, Felixtowe/Harwich, England, seaplane accident, North Sea, off Harwich, England

PAGE, PHILLIPS W, Ensign, USNRF (class 5)


US Submarine F-1 (Carp, No.20), sunk in collision with sister boat F-3, underway off California, all drowned

BELT, JOHN ROBERT, Seaman

BERNARD, FRANK MATTHEW, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

CARTWRIGHT, WILLIAM LESTER, Seaman

CORSON, HARRY LE ROY, Chief Electrician (G)

GOONAN, JAMES, Chief Gunners' Mate

GREENBERG, SIMON, Electrician, 1st class

HALL, EDWARD EMERSON, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

LOVELY, LYMAN FREDERICK, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

McCLUER, RALPH EDGAR, Electrician, 2nd class (G)

McRAE, DUNCAN ARCHIE, Electrician, 1st class

MESSANG, JOHN PETER ALBERT, Chief Machinist's Mate

METZ, GROVER EDWIN, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

SCOTT, RAY ELSWORTH, Electrician, 1st class

SMITH, ELBERT PESHINE, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

STEWART, GUY RAYMOND, Chief Machinist's Mate

STOUGH, DUDLEY, Chief Gunner's Mate (T)

VINCENT, CHARLES FRIDLEY, Electrician, 2nd class (G)

WALSH, THOMAS ALFRED, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

WYATT, CLYDE WILLIAM, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

USS George Washington, ex-German liner, troop transport (ID-3018), both washed overboard in heavy sea

KVIDAHL, GEORGE OSCAR, Seaman, 2nd class

MURPHY, LEO BOYD, Seaman, 2nd class

USS Powhatan, ex-German passenger ship Hamburg, troop transport (ID-3013), steering engine accident

BECKMAN, LAMBERT FREDERICK, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class, killed by escaping steam

December 18, 1917

at home

GREENE, EDWARD FORBES, Lieutenant (retired), respiratory disease, Cambridge, Mass

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

BRANDON, ROY ADLEY, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

BRATT, EARL McKINLEY, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va

BROW (father's name, Brown), JOHN NEUMAN, Seaman, carbolic acid poisoning

San Diego, Calif

MURRY, JOHN JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, illness/disease

December 19, 1917

Headquarters, Newport, R I

MOORE, IRVING T, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass

KNOWLTON, WILLIAM HEWITT, Apprentice Seaman, USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

BROWNELL, LAWRENCE WILLIAM, Electrician, 3rd class USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, New York, N Y

KNOPP, FRANCIS LEMOYNE, Yeoman, 3rd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

ARNOLD, RICHARD ELOS, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

SS Rochester, freighter, torpedoed and sunk by U.95, 800 miles west of Ireland, on November 3

WHEELER, GEORGE FRANKLIN, Seaman, 2nd class, died of exposure, presumably after being picked up

USS Henley, destroyer (later DD-39)

TRUE, HORACE MERRILL, Fireman, 3rd class, found dead in fireroom

December 20, 1917

Naval Hospital, Chelsea Mass

WILDE, FREDERICK HERBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Brooklyn, armored cruiser (No.3, later CA-3), Asiatic Station, at Naval Hospital, Canacao, P I

ZENOR, JOHN ALEXANDER LOGAN, Lieutenant (T), fall on board, presumably DOI

USS Kansas, battleship (later BB-21)

SAMUELSON, BENJAMIN CHRISTOPHER, Gunner's Mate, 3rd class, NNV, injured on board

December 21, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

WARREN, THOMAS, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

McCORD, IRWIN ALONZO, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

MITCHELL, RAYMOND EDWARD, Hospital Apprentice, 2nd class, illness/disease

USS Artemis, ex-German liner Bohemia, troop transport (ID-2187)

BYRNE, JAMES SYLVESTER, Seaman, USNRF, drowned

December 22, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

HARRIS, THOMAS BALDWIN, Musician, 2nd class, illness/disease

WILKINS, MORLEY ALVA, Hospital Apprentice, 3rd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

MILES, JOHN HENRY, Fireman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

DUGAN, JOSEPH BERNARD, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Great Lakes, Ill

DENNEY, JOSEPH COCHRAN, Apprentice Seaman USNRF, illness/disease

Receiving Ship, New York, N Y

SCHNEIDER, GEORGE FREDERICK, Seaman, died

December 23, 1917

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass

FARRELL, JAMES SIMON, Chief Commissary Steward, USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

RUCKER, WILLIAM ERWIN, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

CROWELL, BENTON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

MALONE, JAMES BETHEL, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

December 24, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

HAIRE, EARL S, Machinist's Mate, 1st class, USNRF, poisoned

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

MURPHY, HENRY EDWARD, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, New York, N Y

SULLIVAN, WHARTON REESE, Fireman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

EDWARDS, COY, Seaman, NNV, respiratory disease

December 25, 1917

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla

CROWE, EDMUND JAMES, Seaman, 2nd class (A), USNRF, drowned (not known if flying-related)

Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa

KLINE, MALCOLM WALTER, Boatswain's Mate, 2nd class, illness/disease

Naval Station, Mare Island, Calif

FISH, CORNIE WILLIAM, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Norfolk Va

COMINGS, HARRY, Gunner's Mate, 1st class, USNRF, illness/disease

December 26, 1917

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

WHITE, HENRY FOSTER, Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

ECHAGUE, AMBROSIO, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, injured

SIMPSON, HARVEY WEST, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

December 27, 1917

Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Fla

SQUIRES, JESSE FRANKLIN, Electrician, 2nd class, illness/disease

December 28, 1917

at home

McKISSON, DONALD EDWIN, Electrician, 3rd class (R), USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

STUBBLEFIELD, LLOYD WILLIAM, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Washington, D C

NORRIS, HUGH ROBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Prison, Portsmouth, N H

LEADEN, ROBERT JAMES, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Hartford, old sloop-of-war, Charleston Station Ship

COTTLE, WALTER RALEIGH, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, died

December 29, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

BOOHER, CLARENCE BARNES, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

HOPPER, CLARENCE MELVIN, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Newport, R I

PATCH, ARTHUR TODD, Fireman, 3rd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

FLYNN, FRANK, Fireman, 2nd class, injured, DOI

HALL, JOHN, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Great Lakes, Ill

JOHNSEN, RICHARD, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

December 30, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

COLOMBO, JOHN ARTHUR JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

WALTERS, CHARLES HARTLEY, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Training Camp, Charleston, S C

CALLAHAN, FRANK VARLIN, Seaman, 2nd class, influenza

USS Pentucket, tug (later YT-8), northern Atlantic coast port

GOETZ, CARL, Chief Gunner's Mate, fell overboard and drowned

USS SC-321, submarine chaser

DEAHY, DAVID J, Seaman, USNRF, drowned

December 31, 1917

Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, N Y

KLEIN, JOHN EDWARD, Quartermaster, 2nd class, USNRF, respiratory disease

Receiving Ship, Boston, Mass

HALL, JOSEPH EDWARD, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease


Sault Ste. Marie: 1905

On Shorpy:Today’s Top 5

Not the Essex

From the comments section above: The vessel in the rear of the photo is not the USS Essex, she is the USS Yantic. We know this for many reasons what little of the beak head can be seen is the Yantic (vertical slats vs scroll work on the Essex) and Essex wasn't painted white until after 1910. Also, depending on when this photo was taken, USS Michigan became USS Wolverine on 17 June 1905 so, if this photo was taken after that precise date, she is the Wolverine. She is not Gloria - that is a flag flying in front of the vessel and not her name. Her name would be on her stern. Also, parts of the Wolverine have survived in Erie, PA, and the wreck of the Essex does exist in Duluth, MN. See the work of Maritime Heritage Minnesota for more on Essex we have digitized all her known logbooks and have been monitoring the wreck's condition yearly. USS Essex is the only known example of the work of shipbuilding Donald McKay known to exist anywhere in the world and the wreck of the Essex is on the National Register of HIstoric Places.

The Tepees

The Tepees were part of a "historical" demonstration purportedly showing the descendants of the Ojibwe Indians who lived on the site before being driven off my the white settlers.

A troupe of Indians were brought in by Louis Oliver Armstrong, a Canadian, who was a minister and self-styled "expert" on Native lore and history. He worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway and was a proponent of opening the west to settlement. He was involved in mapping the west and eventually moved into filmmaking, which started with movies in the early 1900s designed to entice European settlement in the Canadian west.

It was L.O. Armstrong who turned the tale of Hiawatha into a play and spread the mythic appeal of the story. This led to the wide fascination with all things "Red Man."

He assembled several troupes of Indian actors - Ojibwe from the Garden River Reserve (which is near Sault Sainte Marie) and Mohawks from Kanewakhe, near Montreal. They put on tableaus, plays and did reenactments based on real historical events. However, because their traditional costumes often didn't register as "authentic" with the public, they were put into more theatrical costumes (buckskin and feather headdresses of the Plains Indians and used tipis instead of the traditional shelters of the area they were supposed to be representing.

In this case, we see Plains Indian tipis, not the wigwams of the Ojibwe (dome-shaped structures made from saplings, bent wood, covered with bark and skins).

The irony is that a good number of the crowd appear to be native, themselves, and are as well dressed as any other European in the crowd. May of them are the descendants of the Indians the troupe are supposedly depicting.

Gunships

These two vessels are Navy gunships -- the U.S.S. Michigan and Essex. The Michigan, renamed Wolverine in 1905, was launched in 1844 as a sidewheeler. The Essex was launched in 1876 as a full rigged propeller steamer. Neither vessel survives.

Hats! Hats! Hats!

A picture like this makes you wonder how many milliners have fallen by the wayside.

Steamships

Great picture, thanks! The ships in the foreground look rather older than 1905, but ships on the Great Lakes often live a long time because fresh water doesn't rust them as quickly as seawater. The one on the left is rigged as a schooner, the one on the right as a barque, but they obviously have main propulsion by steam with the size of the rig reduced because in light winds the iron tops'l would be doing the work. Note that sails are not bent except for the schooner's mizzen, but smoke is coming from the schooner's funnel.

Maddeningly, the name of the schooner can be read easily -- but only the first 4 letters, GLOR, the rest obscured by bunting decorations. Perhaps GLORIANA, or GLORY? There was a sailing yacht by the former name in this period but she was totally different, it couldn't be the same one.

Note the huge steering wheel on top of the barque's bridge and what is almost certainly a polished brass binnacle next to it. Among 19th C. sailors it was considered unseamanlike to steer a vessel from an inside station while under sail because the helmsman had to respond promptly to wind changes. There is a glassed in pilothouse on the level below that was doubtless used more often when under steam.

The schooner is a side wheeler -- you can make out part of the paddle box -- but the barque is evidently equipped with the more "modern" propeller.

On the right background there is a handsome steam yacht that looks like it could have been new or very recent in 1905.

The Indian Lodge

It is possible that not every Shorpy reader has had the privilege of camping in a tipi. Since I have done so at Mountain Man rendezvous, I can attest to the superiority of this ingenious abode. The lodges shown in the picture are canvas, which replaced buffalo hide covers once supplies became available in the 1850's. The upper right lodge shows evidence of much use, judging by the well-smoked top. Although it can be a considerable source of amusement to watch several inexperienced men erect a lodge, with experience the poles can be erected, canvas wrapped, and all tied down in no great length of time. Although mountain men of yore spent much of their time sleeping outdoors or under simple shelters, the man with an Indian wife and lodge lived in comparative luxury. Sheltered from wind and rain, gathered around a flickering fire, coffee or food cooking, lounging at ease with possessions hung from the poles at a convenient height, life is good. As they eyes go heavy and sleep is sought in blankets or buffalo robes, the final sight is the night sky as seen through the smokehole with its welter of poles.
As may generally be known, the doorway is traditionally oriented to the east to catch the morning sun, by which we can infer this picture was taken in mid-afternoon, and the two flaps are directed by their poles to point downwind to encourage smoke to leave the lodge, or in the worst weather, to close up the smokehole. The circle of lodges with openings pointed inwards, as seen in movies were a director's artistic pretension. And of course, we now know where the lodgepole pine got its name.


Yantic River is slowly claiming the 1860s Upper Falls Dam in Norwich

Published July 05. 2020 5:35PM | Updated July 06. 2020 3:54PM

By Claire Bessette Day staff writer

Norwich — When the Yantic River water level is low, the Upper Falls Dam looks like it has had a few teeth knocked out.

And another section is teetering and looks about to join its mates in the deep pool of water beneath the dam.

The city has no plans to either demolish or repair the dam, which serves no function and is not a barrier to fish migration, city Public Works Director Patrick McLaughlin said. City officials for years considered removing the river channel portion of the dam to reduce Yantic River flooding upstream at the Sherman Street bridge and in the Norwichtown area.

McLaughlin said the removal was consideredਊgain as part of a plan to replace the Sherman Street bridge — known locally as the Canada Bridge, supposedly for the builder, who was named Canada.

But state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection officials determined the removal of the dam would only reduce flooding by about a foot, not significant enough to justify the costs. Bridge designers instead raised the height of a planned new spanꂫove projected flood levels, McLaughlin said.

Because of the location of the Yantic Falls natural gorge a short way downstream, fish historically did not reach the Upper Falls area, so the city is not under any obligation to provide a fish passageway there, McLaughlin said.

The granite dam dates to the 1860s, when it first provided the waterpower to run machinery in the Falls Mill downstream and later generated electricity to power the mill, City Historian Dale Plummer said. Earthworks built up behind the dam form a gentle slope, except for an open narrow channel that flows through a 3-by-3-foot square hole at the base, where a wooden and metal control gate decayed years ago.

The hole, however, is no longer square, as stones that lined the opening were among the first to drop into the river. One long stone remains in place atop the opening, but above that is jagged dark space. Along the top of the dam, the second layer of stones is mostly missing. When the river is high enough, water seeps through the stonework as it cascades down the face of the dam.

The dam stands in the heart of an industrial enclave that existedਏrom the 1600s to the 1960s, when Falls Mill closed, Plummer said. Of course, prior to English settlement, the entire area was a centerpiece for Native Americans, he said. The Mohegan tribe’s royal burial ground is located nearby in what is now the Chelsea Parade area, and the Yantic Falls area is the site of the 1643 Mohegan-Narragansett battle.

In early Colonial times, there was a gristmill at the foot of the natural gorge of Yantic Falls, flaxseed and linseed pressing operations to make oil, and a century later, early manufacturing ventures started with Christopher Leffingwell’s paper mill and chocolate mill with a dam a bit farther upstream in 1766, Plummer said.

The entire area, from north of the current Sherman Street bridge, to the base of the natural gorge became a 𠇌ommonwealth site,” Plummer said, with space rented to various mill operators into the early 19th century. Eventually, the much larger Falls Mill took over the area and built what is now the Upper Falls Dam in 1860 and the small powerhouse in the early 20th century. The remnants of Leffingwell’s mill could be seen falling into the widened river and mud in an 1860s photo, Plummer said.

“It’s a very, very, very, complex site,” Plummer said, “very important in understanding the industrialization of the area. That dam is part of its evolution.”

Today, visitors can see remnants of the historic significance of the area. It is a popular spot for curiosity seekers after storms, when the river, nicknamed 𠇏rantic Yantic,” shows its power.

The city received a federal grant in the 1990s to develop the Upper Falls Heritage Park. A long driveway led to the dam and powerhouse, which was renovated into a museum. Old mill grinding stones that littered the area were arranged to line the driveway and cul de sac. Lack of funding and the isolation of the area led officials to close the powerhouse and board it up for protection.

“It just has layers and layers and layers of history going back to the 1600s, and Native Americans before,” Plummer said. “It’s had a whole variety of presence from the Native Americans on down. The variety of industrial processes used there is pretty wide and varied and incredible.”


USS Yantic - History

CASUALTIES of the UNITED STATES NAVY and COAST GUARD

by Date and Ship/Base - December 1917

US Submarine F-1, lost with all hands December 17, 1917 (US Naval Historical Center, click to enlarge)

1. Information is in order - Date of death, Ship, Base or Location, Incident, Name, Rank, Service other than USN, Cause of death. (For Next of kin and Appointment/Enlistment information, see lists by Name)
2. Main abbreviations: A - Aviation, DOI - died of injuries, DOW - died of wounds, F - Female, G - General, JG - junior grade, NNV - National Naval Volunteers, R - Radio, USNRF - US Naval Reserve Force, USNRC - United States Naval Reserve Corps
3. Ranks of US Navy Commissioned Officers and Enlisted Men
4. See also Casualties by Name, starting at Abbate and ending at Zwieseland

DECEMBER

December 2, 1917

USS America, ex-German liner Amerika, troop transport (ID-3006)

BURDET, FRANCIS, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease (right - thanks to Eric Nash)

December 3, 1917

Naval Hospital, New York, N Y

BOWSER, JAMES MONROE, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

ALTMAN, IRBY ANDERSON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

STARK, HARRY EARL, Fireman, 3rd class, illness /disease

WILLINGHAM, WILLIE MORGAN, Fireman, 2nd class, illness/disease

Norfolk, Va

WILLIAMS, RICHARD BLAND, Surgeon (Medical Corps), wounded, but not in action

USS George Washington, ex-German liner, troop transport (ID-3018)

STOREY, DANIEL DEWEY, Seaman, 2nd class, injured

December 4, 1917

Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa

DUNCAN, JAMES BRADY, Blacksmith, respiratory disease

Naval Training Station, Cedar Falls, Iowa

MINKLE, HAROLD WATSON, Seaman, 2nd class, killed by train

Quincy, Mass

WELLS, JOHN C, Chief Machinist's Mate, USNRF, accident, died

December 5, 1917

Aviation Naval Headquarters, Paris, France, airplane accident (location probably outside Paris)

BAKER, CLAUDE ALBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, drowned

St Marys Hospital, Hoboken N J

ABEL, LUTHER VELVIN, Seaman, 2nd class, injured

USS Yantic, old wooden-hulled gunboat, training ship, Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

OAK, HARRY ARTHUR, Chief Boatswain's Mate, USNRF, illness/disease

December 6, 1917

Naval Hospital, Annapolis, Md

IRWIN, GLENDON WARD, Ensign, died

Naval Hospital, Maiden, Mass

BOYLE, JOHN JOSEPH, Chief Water Tender, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

RICE, EARL ALBERT, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

HALL, JOHN MARSHALL, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Jacob Jones (above also image of the torpedo exploding, taken by Seaman William G Ellis. No enlargement), destroyer (No.61), sailing Brest, France for Queenstown, Ireland, torpedoed and sunk by U.53

ANDERSEN, HENRY P, Gunner's Mate, 2nd class

BIELATOWICZ, JOHN WILLIAM, Seaman, 2nd class

BRAMMALL, JOHN THOMAS, Jr, Chief Water Tender

BRANNIGAN, JAMES, Fireman, 2nd class

BRYAN, GEORGE FREDERICK, Seaman, 2nd class

BUTLER, JOHN EDWARD, Fireman, 2nd class

CHAPPIE, FRANK WILLIAM, Seaman, 2nd class

COONEY, JOHN JOSEPH, Chief Water Tender

COSTIGAN, MAURICE JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class

CROSS, JAMES FRANK MORISON, Gunner's Mate, 1st class

CUMMINGS, JAMES, Seaman, 2nd class

DISMUKE, EDWARD TOM, Gunner's Mate, 2nd class

DONOVAN, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Boiler maker

EBISCH, CABL G, Quartermaster, 3rd class

FAVREAU, HENRY PHILIPPE, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

FISHER, REGINALD JOHN, Seaman, 2nd class

FITZGERALD, JAMES STEPHEN, Gunner's Mate, 2nd class

FLAHERTY, JOHN JAMES, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

FLANAGHAN, THOMAS HENRY, Seaman, 2nd class

FRANCIS, JAMES ALVA, Electrician, 3rd class

FRENCH, CHARLES, Fireman, 1st class, Fleet Reserve

GIFFORD, WILLIAM THOMAS, Fireman, 2nd class

GREGORY, SCHUYLER, Coppersmith

GRINNELL, CLIFTON STEPHENS, Seaman, 2nd class

HIGHET, LELAND McKEAND, Seaman, 2nd class

HILL, LUTHER, Fireman, 1st class

HOOD, HARRY R, Gunner

JASKOLSKI, FRANCIS JOHN, Fireman, 2nd class

JOHNSON, DOCK, Cabin Cook

KALK, STANTON F, Lieutenant (JG), exposure

KEARNEY, WILLIAM HIRST, Oiler

LA COMBE, HENRY JOSEPH, Fireman, 2nd class

LASKON, WILLIAM FRANK, Fireman, 1st class

LEEDY, ARCHIE, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

LENTZ, HERBERT PAUL, Fireman, 2nd class

MAGENUEIMER, FREDERICK, Fireman, 1st class

McGINTY, JOHN WILLIAM, Water Tender

McKEOWN, BERNARD JOSEPH, Fireman, 1st class

MENDES, JOSE ANTHONY, Fireman, 1st class

MERKEL, GEORGE CHRISTIAN, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

MICHALEO, JOHN, Seaman, 2nd class

MONTIEL, ALFONSO, Mess Attendant, 2nd class

MORGAN, EUGENE JOHN, Yeoman, 2nd class

MORRISSETTE, WALTER, Ship's Cook, 1st class, injured

MURPHY, JOSEPH PATRICK, Fireman, 3rd class, injured

MURPHY, SIMON THOMAS, Fireman, 3rd class

NEE, MARTIN JOSEPH, Chief Machinist's Mate

PETERSON, ARTHUR JOSEPH, Quartermaster, 1st class

PHILLIPS, ADOLPH, Water Tender

PLANT, HOWARD WILLIAM, Electrician, 3rd class (R)

POTE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Oiler

ROGERS, COIT SEYMOUR, Storekeeper, 3rd class

ROGERS, GEORGE FRANCIS, Fireman, 3rd class

SANFORD, CHARLIE HEIDEL, Ship’s Cook, 3rd class

SIMMONS, CHARLES ROBERT, Machinist's Mate, 1st class (BN - killed in accident)

SIMPSON, WALLACE, Cabin Steward

SOHN, WILLIAM HENRY, Chief Machinist's Mate

STARK, RICHARD JOSEPH, Quartermaster, 1st class

STEINER, SIMON, Chief Quartermaster

SWEENEY, JAMES TEREANCE, Oiler

TUFTS, JOHN THOMAS, Blacksmith

WETZEL, LEON JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class

WILLIAMS, RALPH BURGEE, Seaman


(Note: the above list totals 63 men lost. Variations include Naval History and Heritage Center - 64 lost, and Wikipedia - 66, 2 officers and 64 men. The differences need reconciliation)


December 7, 1917

Naval Air Station, Hampton Roads, Va

RICHTER, GEORGE, Quartermaster, 1st class, USNRF, injured (not known if flying-related)

Naval Hospital, Canacao, P I

SCHAEFER, JOSEPH, Chief Electrician (G), died of burns

Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

HUTCHESON, ROY ALVIN, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Huntington, ex-West Virginia, armored cruiser (No.5, later CA-5)

SPANGLER, GEORGE ANDREW, Seaman, 2nd class, drowned

USS Montana, armored cruiser (No.13, later CA-13)

WILLIAMS, BRUCE BRECHEEN, Yeoman, 3rd class, drowned

USS Solace, hospital ship (later AH-2)

FORE, ELLIE ELBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

December 8, 1917

USS Jacob Jones, destroyer (No.61), sailing Brest, France for Queenstown, Ireland, torpedoed and sunk by U.53 (on 6th)

DOLEZAL, GEORGE, Water Tender, presumably DOI

Willard Parker Hospital, New York, N Y

LYONS, RAYMOND THOMAS, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

December 9, 1917

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

GOUGH, EARNEST MARVIN, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Submarine Base, San Pedro, Calif

McCRARY, HARRY LEE, Electrician, 1st class, injured

USS Georgia, battleship (later BB-15)

GROZIER, EDGAR SNOW, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class, respiratory disease

December 10, 1917

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass

SHINN, EDWARD COFFIN, Chief Water Tender, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

SPROUSE, EMMET, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

USS Antigone, ex-German Neckar, troop transport (ID-3007)

WHITE, ALBERT E, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, drowned

USS Solace, hospital ship (later AH-2)

DILLON, FRANCIS XAVIER, Electrician, 2nd class, NNV, respiratory disease

December 11, 1917

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

RAMSEY, WILLIAM HENRY, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

USS Baltimore, ex-protected cruiser (No.3), minelayer (later CM-1)

PINKE, JOHN HOWARD, Cabin Steward, illness/disease

USS Cuyama, oil tanker (No.3, later AO-3)

GLEICH, RICHARD NORMAN, Seaman, 2nd class, fell from foremast

USS Frederick, ex-Maryland, armored cruiser (No.8, later CA-8)

WARREN, CHARLES, Fireman, 1st class, injured

December 12, 1917

Naval Hospital, Mare Island, Calif

CARNALL, MILTON PAGE, Oiler, NNV, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

EVANS, GEORGE STOKER, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

STEPHENSON, JOHN R, Seaman, NNV, illness/disease

Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill

PRICE, LAWRENCE HANNON, Fireman, 3rd class, United States Naval Force, died

Philadelphia, Pa

BURTON, RICHARD, Jr, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, trolley car accident

Receiving Ship, Washington, D C

MULCAHY, JOHN MICHAEL, Fireman, 1st class, illness/disease

USS Chemung, ex-USS Pocohontas, fleet tug (No.18), fire room blaze

HAMPTON, LOYD JOHN, Water Tender

ROSS, BRUCE W, Machinist, burns, died at Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va (BN - duplicated entry, also ROSS, BRUCE WALLACE, Chief Machinist's Mate NHC - Machinist trainee)

USS Elizabeth (above), ex-chandler's workboat, patrol boat (SP-972), Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, Va, sunk in collision with SS Northland (British-owned) in Norfolk Harbor (later salvaged)

ROSE, THOMAS JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, drowned

TOERPE, ARTHUR BEN, Ordnance Gunner (R), injured, died at Naval Hospital, Norfolk

December 13, 1917

Naval Hospital, Newport R I

SADDLER, EDWARD, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

BIGGER, DAVID WATSON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Mare Island, Calif

PICHETT, ZIP EDWARD, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

New York, N Y

DUNN, HENRY ALBERT, Medical Inspector, illness/disease

St Luke's Hospital, New York, N Y

THOMPSON, ANDREW, Boatswain's Mate, 1st class, USNRF, illness/disease

USS Chemung, ex-USS Pocohontas, fleet tug (No.18 ) ) , fire room blaze on 12th

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM, Chief Water Tender, died of burns at Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

USS Shada, ex-motor boat, patrol craft (SP-580), coast from Boston to Maine

BROKAW SHERMAN SEAL, Seaman, USNRF, lost overboard

December 14, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

FOORD, J S, Apprentice Seaman USNRF, frostbite

LANCASTER, AUBREY, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

BUTLER, MONETTE FORD, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

KEMP, ARON WILSON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

RATHBONE, PETER WILLIAM, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

SATURDAY, MAJOR McKINLEY, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

USS Hull, destroyer (later DD-7)

MATTESON, WILLIAM FRANCIS, Seaman, 2nd class, lost overboard

USS Shada, ex-motor boat, patrol craft (SP-580), coast from Boston to Maine

BOLGER, JAMES, Seaman, USNRF, drowned

USS Sonoma, fleet tug (later AT-12), Atlantic Fleet tender

WEIR, JOHN JOSEPH, Carpenter's Mate, 3rd class, lost overboard

December 15, 1917

Lincoln Hospital, New York, N Y

HAMMER, JAS MARTIN, Seaman, poisoned by illuminating gas

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

DUFFY, LEO JOHN, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

FRAZIER, HUGH ARTHUR, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

McSWEEN, BONNIE, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, San Pedro, Calif

HILL, MARTIN JEREMIAH, Chief Machinist's Mate, illness/disease

Royal Italian Naval Hospital, Naples

HESLEP, WALTER JAMES, Oiler, injured

St Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, D C

MEALLEY, THADDEUS, Chief Yeoman, illness/disease

USS Amphitrite, ex-monitor (BM 2), guardship, New York harbor

RETTIGER, GEORGE H, Seaman, NNV, illness/disease

USS Pittsburgh, ex-Pennsylvania, armored cruiser (No.4, later CA-4), most of war in South American waters

STEWART, OSCAR WILL, Fireman, 3rd class, injured

December 17, 1917

Naval Hospital, Newport, R I

WEED, DAVID JONATHAN, Apprentice Seaman, illness /disease

Naval Hospital, Newport, R I

ELLIOTT AMASA, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

DUNYHUE, WILLIAM ANDIE, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

WALLER, LAURAMA MALONE, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Aviation, possibly based at Royal Naval Air Station, Felixtowe/Harwich, England, seaplane accident, North Sea, off Harwich, England

PAGE, PHILLIPS W, Ensign, USNRF (class 5)


US Submarine F-1 (Carp, No.20), sunk in collision with sister boat F-3, underway off California, all drowned

BELT, JOHN ROBERT, Seaman

BERNARD, FRANK MATTHEW, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

CARTWRIGHT, WILLIAM LESTER, Seaman

CORSON, HARRY LE ROY, Chief Electrician (G)

GOONAN, JAMES, Chief Gunners' Mate

GREENBERG, SIMON, Electrician, 1st class

HALL, EDWARD EMERSON, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

LOVELY, LYMAN FREDERICK, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

McCLUER, RALPH EDGAR, Electrician, 2nd class (G)

McRAE, DUNCAN ARCHIE, Electrician, 1st class

MESSANG, JOHN PETER ALBERT, Chief Machinist's Mate

METZ, GROVER EDWIN, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

SCOTT, RAY ELSWORTH, Electrician, 1st class

SMITH, ELBERT PESHINE, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class

STEWART, GUY RAYMOND, Chief Machinist's Mate

STOUGH, DUDLEY, Chief Gunner's Mate (T)

VINCENT, CHARLES FRIDLEY, Electrician, 2nd class (G)

WALSH, THOMAS ALFRED, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

WYATT, CLYDE WILLIAM, Machinist's Mate, 1st class

USS George Washington, ex-German liner, troop transport (ID-3018), both washed overboard in heavy sea

KVIDAHL, GEORGE OSCAR, Seaman, 2nd class

MURPHY, LEO BOYD, Seaman, 2nd class

USS Powhatan, ex-German passenger ship Hamburg, troop transport (ID-3013), steering engine accident

BECKMAN, LAMBERT FREDERICK, Machinist's Mate, 2nd class, killed by escaping steam

December 18, 1917

at home

GREENE, EDWARD FORBES, Lieutenant (retired), respiratory disease, Cambridge, Mass

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

BRANDON, ROY ADLEY, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

BRATT, EARL McKINLEY, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va

BROW (father's name, Brown), JOHN NEUMAN, Seaman, carbolic acid poisoning

San Diego, Calif

MURRY, JOHN JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, illness/disease

December 19, 1917

Headquarters, Newport, R I

MOORE, IRVING T, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass

KNOWLTON, WILLIAM HEWITT, Apprentice Seaman, USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

BROWNELL, LAWRENCE WILLIAM, Electrician, 3rd class USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, New York, N Y

KNOPP, FRANCIS LEMOYNE, Yeoman, 3rd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

ARNOLD, RICHARD ELOS, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

SS Rochester, freighter, torpedoed and sunk by U.95, 800 miles west of Ireland, on November 3

WHEELER, GEORGE FRANKLIN, Seaman, 2nd class, died of exposure, presumably after being picked up

USS Henley, destroyer (later DD-39)

TRUE, HORACE MERRILL, Fireman, 3rd class, found dead in fireroom

December 20, 1917

Naval Hospital, Chelsea Mass

WILDE, FREDERICK HERBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Brooklyn, armored cruiser (No.3, later CA-3), Asiatic Station, at Naval Hospital, Canacao, P I

ZENOR, JOHN ALEXANDER LOGAN, Lieutenant (T), fall on board, presumably DOI

USS Kansas, battleship (later BB-21)

SAMUELSON, BENJAMIN CHRISTOPHER, Gunner's Mate, 3rd class, NNV, injured on board

December 21, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

WARREN, THOMAS, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

McCORD, IRWIN ALONZO, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

MITCHELL, RAYMOND EDWARD, Hospital Apprentice, 2nd class, illness/disease

USS Artemis, ex-German liner Bohemia, troop transport (ID-2187)

BYRNE, JAMES SYLVESTER, Seaman, USNRF, drowned

December 22, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

HARRIS, THOMAS BALDWIN, Musician, 2nd class, illness/disease

WILKINS, MORLEY ALVA, Hospital Apprentice, 3rd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

MILES, JOHN HENRY, Fireman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

DUGAN, JOSEPH BERNARD, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Great Lakes, Ill

DENNEY, JOSEPH COCHRAN, Apprentice Seaman USNRF, illness/disease

Receiving Ship, New York, N Y

SCHNEIDER, GEORGE FREDERICK, Seaman, died

December 23, 1917

Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass

FARRELL, JAMES SIMON, Chief Commissary Steward, USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

RUCKER, WILLIAM ERWIN, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

CROWELL, BENTON, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

MALONE, JAMES BETHEL, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

December 24, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

HAIRE, EARL S, Machinist's Mate, 1st class, USNRF, poisoned

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

MURPHY, HENRY EDWARD, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, New York, N Y

SULLIVAN, WHARTON REESE, Fireman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

EDWARDS, COY, Seaman, NNV, respiratory disease

December 25, 1917

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla

CROWE, EDMUND JAMES, Seaman, 2nd class (A), USNRF, drowned (not known if flying-related)

Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa

KLINE, MALCOLM WALTER, Boatswain's Mate, 2nd class, illness/disease

Naval Station, Mare Island, Calif

FISH, CORNIE WILLIAM, Fireman, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Norfolk Va

COMINGS, HARRY, Gunner's Mate, 1st class, USNRF, illness/disease

December 26, 1917

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

WHITE, HENRY FOSTER, Seaman, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

ECHAGUE, AMBROSIO, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, injured

SIMPSON, HARVEY WEST, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

December 27, 1917

Naval Hospital, Pensacola, Fla

SQUIRES, JESSE FRANKLIN, Electrician, 2nd class, illness/disease

December 28, 1917

at home

McKISSON, DONALD EDWIN, Electrician, 3rd class (R), USNRF, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

STUBBLEFIELD, LLOYD WILLIAM, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Washington, D C

NORRIS, HUGH ROBERT, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Prison, Portsmouth, N H

LEADEN, ROBERT JAMES, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

USS Hartford, old sloop-of-war, Charleston Station Ship

COTTLE, WALTER RALEIGH, Seaman, 2nd class, USNRF, died

December 29, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

BOOHER, CLARENCE BARNES, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, League Island, Pa

HOPPER, CLARENCE MELVIN, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease

Naval Hospital, Newport, R I

PATCH, ARTHUR TODD, Fireman, 3rd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

FLYNN, FRANK, Fireman, 2nd class, injured, DOI

HALL, JOHN, Mess Attendant, 3rd class, respiratory disease

Naval Station, Great Lakes, Ill

JOHNSEN, RICHARD, Apprentice Seaman, illness/disease

December 30, 1917

Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill

COLOMBO, JOHN ARTHUR JOSEPH, Seaman, 2nd class, illness/disease

Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va

WALTERS, CHARLES HARTLEY, Apprentice Seaman, respiratory disease

Training Camp, Charleston, S C

CALLAHAN, FRANK VARLIN, Seaman, 2nd class, influenza

USS Pentucket, tug (later YT-8), northern Atlantic coast port

GOETZ, CARL, Chief Gunner's Mate, fell overboard and drowned

USS SC-321, submarine chaser

DEAHY, DAVID J, Seaman, USNRF, drowned

December 31, 1917

Naval Hospital, Brooklyn, N Y

KLEIN, JOHN EDWARD, Quartermaster, 2nd class, USNRF, respiratory disease

Receiving Ship, Boston, Mass

HALL, JOSEPH EDWARD, Seaman, 2nd class, respiratory disease


Historic Yantic Village stone bridge being restored

Published July 03. 2020 4:30PM

By Claire Bessette Day staff writer

Norwich — A giant granite block jigsaw puzzle project is underway in the historic Yantic mill village, where bridge construction and masonry specialists are meticulously disassembling and reassembling the 1905 Sunnyside Road bridge over the Yantic River.

The $2 million project, funded with 80% federal highway grants and 20% city funding, had been planned for several years, city Public Works Director Patrick McLaughlin said. But city officials decided early on to wait for a state Department of Transportation rule change that would allow federal highway funds to be used for rehabilitation of historic bridges, rather than replacement with modern structures.

The bridge is only 18 feet wide, with a sidewalk along the south side and alternating one-way traffic. It still provides the only access to about 40 to 50 homes in the Yantic mill village. The historic restoration means the bridge will not be widened, but the asphalt sidewalk has been ripped out and will be replaced with a stamped-pattern concrete walkway.

Decorative lighting will be installed at each end and in the center, where semi-circle stone bump-outs and benches allow pedestrians to rest and view the Yantic River below.

The 1905-08 bridge was built by Winslow Tracy Williams, third generation owner of the nearby Yantic Woolen Mill and the mill village. Williams built the bridge to accompany his new 𠇎normous” elaborate stone mansion home on the hill overlooking the village, city Historian Dale Plummer said.

On the mill side, the granite stone bridge is flanked by two matching guardhouse-looking structures topped with slate roofs. Never used as a guardhouse or toll station, the structures provided a “romanticized” grand entrance to Williams’ medieval style estate, Plummer said.

“It gave his workers the ability to cross over, but more importantly, it gave him the ability to cross over the river,” Plummer said. “These mill owners lived a baronial lifestyle. And here you have a quasi-medieval bridge, which certainly fits with that image.”

McLaughlin said the substructure of the bridge is sound, but the stonewalls along the sides had started to lean. At one point, the slate roofs on the entrance structures had been replaced with wood. That has since rotted, so the plan is to restore the slate roofs.

Mattern Construction of Baltic is the lead contractor, with masonry crews from B.W. Dexter Masonry of Danielson. The skilled masons take photos of the bridge walls, number the granite blocks, remove them, build the concrete base to shore up the bridge and then rebuild the wall, one section at a time, project superintendent Ryan Mish of Mattern Construction said.

It’s much different than the usual bridge job, Mish said, which would have crews rip out the old bridge and replace it with a modern, perhaps widened new structure. Traffic remains open over the bridge, with only brief closures at any one time. Concrete barriers protect the workers, but traffic is very slow, as drivers catch a glimpse of the work in progress.

“It’s nice to hear people saying: ‘it’s looking good,’” he said. 𠇊t the beginning, they were skeptical that it would look the same.”

Mattern created a temporary wooden bridge over the wetlands beneath the bridge to allow the bucket lift vehicle to reach the side of the bridge from below. He asked crews to remove trash and debris while they are down there. “I don’t like leaving messes behind,” he said.

“It’s a tricky job, dealing with the one-way traffic,” Mish said. “Having to accommodate traffic does limit our work area.”

The project is expected to be completed by Oct. 28.

Mish said the group hasn’t found any historical artifacts during the work so far but has discovered a bunch of what appear to be leftover granite blocks, some of them quite large, that were just dumped into the wetland.

The granite bridge had replaced an earlier bridge and was met with big fanfare. Williams was chairman of the city’s 250th anniversary celebration in 1909, and Williams ushered the guest of honor, President William Howard Taft, over the new bridge in his motorcade vehicle. Taft stayed at Williams' mansion during his visit.

“So, this bridge has architectural significance, and historical significance because of the mill and the mill owners,” Plummer said. “It’s a beautiful bridge. It’s good they took their time and were really thoughtful about it. It’s nice to be able to walk over it. It enhances the village and makes Yantic more of a place again. It helps to retain its character as a village in the city.”


JUDY WOODRUFF:

And now to our NEWSHOUR Shares, something that caught our eye that may be of interest to you, too. After more than seven decades, the remains of one of the worst disasters U.S. naval history have been found, thanks to a wealthy philanthropist, a Navy historian and a state-of-the-art research vessel.

The NewsHour's Julia Griffin explains.

That's it, Paul. We've got it. The Indy.

JULIA GRIFFIN:

With those words, a 72-year old mystery was solved, and a historical treasure rediscovered on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean: the wreckage of the World War II naval cruiser, the USS Indianapolis.

On July 30th, 1945, the Indianapolis was at sea, having just completed a top-secret mission delivering key components of the atomic bomb Little Boy to a naval base in the Northern Mariana Islands, when it was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine. Just 15 minutes later, the ship that survived the Pearl Harbor attack was underwater.

Eight hundred of her 1,196 sailors are thought to have initially survived the sinking, but with the U.S. Navy unaware of the loss, the men were forced to float for four days in shark-infested waters before being spotted by a patrolling bomber plane.

Ultimately, only 316 survived the ordeal. For decades, the final resting place of the Indianapolis was lost to the ocean.

RICHARD HULVER, Naval Historian:

All the paperwork is lost. There was no signal that went out. So, basically, we had nothing but the recollections of the crew, the survivors. So, it was really an imprecise location at the beginning.

JULIA GRIFFIN:

But last year, naval historian Richard Hulver discovered naval landing craft LST 779 had passed the Indianapolis just hours before the attack.

RICHARD HULVER:

So, about 11 hours before Indianapolis was sunk. If you can figure out where LST 779 was, that gives you another point on that, another data point on that route that can give you a better idea.

JULIA GRIFFIN:

With the new data in hand, a civilian research team led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen took up the search again.

PAUL ALLEN, Co-Founder, Microsoft:

We try to do these both as really exciting examples of underwater archaeology and as tributes to the brave men that went down on these ships.

JULIA GRIFFIN:

This time, the research vessel turned it's attention west of the original location estimate and hunted through a new, 600-square-mile patch of the Pacific Ocean. Ultimately, one of the team's remotely-operated underwater vehicles spotted the ship, its anchor and other paraphernalia, more than 18,000 feet below the surface.

Naval History and Heritage Command Director Sam Cox hopes the discovery will underscore more than just the ship's demise.

SAM COX, Director, Naval History and Command: Even in a great tragedy like this one, there is valor, there is bravery. And in the case of this crew that made the ultimate sacrifice, you know, what they did needs to be remembered and not just for getting torpedoed and sunk. They were heroes.


Watch the video: USS Cleveland Class Light Cruiser,Design,Specification and Military History (June 2022).